U.S. aircraft carrier joins South Korea drills

North Korea warns the United States of “merciless” attacks if the carrier infringes on its sovereignty or dignity during U.S.-South Korean drills. With the USS Carl Vinson ploughing through seas off South Korea, rival North Korea has warned the United States of “merciless” attacks if the carrier infringes on its sovereignty or dignity during US-South Korean drills. F-18 fighter jets took off from the flight deck of the nuclear-powered carrier in a dramatic display of US firepower amid rising tension with the North, which has alarmed its neighbours with two nuclear tests and a series of missile launches since last year. “While this is a routine deployment for the Carl Vinson strike group, really the centrepiece for us… is this exercise we’re doing with the ROK navy called ‘Foal Eagle’,” Rear Admiral James W. Kilby, commander of the Carrier Strike Group 1, said, referring to South Korea as the Republic of Korea.

South Korean president Park Geun-hye impeached

Ousted South Korean leader Park Geun-hye has now left the presidential palace, two days after judges upheld parliament’s decision to impeach her. Ms Park arrived at her home in southern Seoul amid waving supporters. She has been impeached over her role in a corruption scandal involving close friend, Choi Soon-sil. Ms Park said in a statement: “Although it will take time, I believe the truth will certainly come out.” She also apologised to her supporters for “failing to fulfil my duty as president”. Ms Park has now lost her immunity and could face criminal proceedings over accusations she allowed Ms Choi to extort money from companies in return for political favours.
Park Geun-hye was ferried to her private residence in Seoul in a black limousine, chased by a posse of journalists on motorbikes. When she arrived, she waved to cheering supporters, smiling broadly, and shook hands with political allies. She may yet face prosecution and a trial in an ordinary criminal court. Her demise has split the country, with her increasingly vocal supporters saying she is a victim of a political decision. Her demeanour outside her new residence was upbeat and full of smiles. It was not the demeanour of a disgraced, regretful politician.

 

 

 

 

 

North Korea’s secretive missile program

North Korea is believed to have more than 1,000 missiles of varying capabilities, including long-range missiles, which could one day strike the US. Pyongyang’s programme has progressed over the last few decades from tactical artillery rockets in the 1960s and 70s, to short­-range and medium-range ballistic missiles in the 1980s and 90s. Systems capable of even greater ranges are now understood to be under research and development.

Missile ranges

Short range: 1,000km or less

Medium range: 1,000-3,000km

Intermediate range: 3,000-5,500 km

Intercontinental range: Greater than 5,500km

Source: Federation of American Scientists

Short-range missiles

North Korea’s modern missile programme began with Scuds, with its first batch reportedly coming via Egypt in 1976.

By 1984, it was building its own versions called Hwasongs.

It is believed to have a variety of these short-range missiles which could target neighbouring South Korea. Relations between the two Koreas are fraught and they remain, technically, in a state of war. The Hwasong-5 and Hwasong-6, also known as Scud-B and C, have ranges of 300km and 500km respectively, according to the US Center for Nonproliferation Studies. These missiles can deliver conventional warheads, but may also have biological, chemical and nuclear capabilities. Both these missiles have been tested and deployed, and the Hwasong-6 has also been sold to Iran.

Intercontinental ballistic missiles

North Korea is believed to be developing its longest-range missile, a road-mobile weapon which observers have dubbed the KN-08 or Hwasong-13. One of the first signs of this development was in September 2016, when the country tested a new rocket engine which some said could power an intercontinental ballistic missile. The US Pentagon believes North Korea has at least six KN-08s in its possession, which could be capable of reaching much of the United States. North Korea is believed to have also developed an upgraded version called KN-14. Neither missile has been publicly tested before.

The strange death of Kim Jong Nam

Security footage of the events leading up to the death of the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at Kuala Lumpur International Airport. Kim Jong-nam was the eldest son of Kim Jong-il, leader of North Korea. From roughly 1994 to 2001, he was considered the heir apparent to his father. In May 2001, following a failed attempt to visit Tokyo Disneyland by entering Japan with a fake passport, he was thought to have fallen out of favour with his father. Kim was exiled from North Korea around 2003, becoming an occasional critic of his family’s regime and an advocate for reform. His younger paternal half-brother, Kim Jong-un, was named heir apparent in September 2010. Kim’s death in Malaysia in February 2017 is alleged to have been a result of poisoning by 2 women, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met China’s top leaders

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met China’s top leaders on Saturday in a bid to persuade them to exert pressure on North Korea to scale back its belligerent rhetoric and, eventually, return to nuclear talks.

Travelling to Beijing for the first time as secretary of state, Kerry made no secret of his desire to see China take a more activist stance towards North Korea, which in recent weeks has threatened nuclear war against the United States and South Korea.

As the North’s main trading partner, financial backer and the closest thing it has to a diplomatic ally, China has a unique ability to use its leverage against the impoverished, isolated state, Kerry said in the South Korean capital, Seoul, on Friday before leaving for Beijing.

“Mr. President, this is obviously a critical time with some very challenging issues – issues on the Korean peninsula, the challenge of Iran and nuclear weapons, Syria and the Middle East, and economies around the world that are in need of a boost,” Kerry told Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People.See More

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Ban Ki-moon

English: Ban Ki-moon 日本語: 潘基文
English: Ban Ki-moon  

Ban Ki-moon (Hangul반기문Hanja潘基文; born 13 June 1944) is the eighth and current Secretary-General of the United Nations, after succeeding Kofi Annan in 2007. Before becoming Secretary-General, Ban was a career diplomat in South Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and in the United Nations. He entered diplomatic service the year he graduated from university, accepting his first post in New Delhi, India. In the foreign ministry, he established a reputation for modesty and competence.
Ban was the foreign minister of South Korea from January 2004 to November 2006. In February 2006, he began to campaign for the office of Secretary-General. Ban was initially considered to be a long shot for the office. As foreign minister of South Korea, however, he was able to travel to all of the countries that were members of the United Nations Security Council, a maneuver that turned him into the front runner.
On 11 October 2006, he was elected to be the eighth Secretary-General by the United Nations General Assembly and officially succeeded Annan on 1 January 2007. Ban has led several major reforms regarding peacekeeping and UN employment practices. Diplomatically, Ban has taken particularly strong views on Darfur, where he helped persuade Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir to allow peacekeeping troops to enterSudan; and on global warming, pressing the issue repeatedly with former U.S. President George W. Bush. Ban has received strong criticism from OIOS, the UN internal audit unit, stating that the secretariat, under Ban’s leadership, is “drifting into irrelevance”.[2]
In 2011, Ban ran unopposed for a second term as Secretary-General. On 21 June 2011, he was unanimously re-elected by the General Assembly and therefore will continue to serve until 31 December 2016.[3][4]

Early life and education

Ban was born in a small farming village in North Chungcheong Province, in June 1944. His family then moved to the nearby town of Chungju, where he grew up.[5] During Ban’s childhood, his father had a warehouse business, but the warehouse went bankrupt and the family lost its middle-class standard of living. When Ban was six, his family fled to a remote mountainside for much of the Korean War.[1] After the war ended, his family returned to Chungju. Ban has mentioned meeting American soldiers at this time.[6]
In secondary school (Chungju High School), Ban became a star student, particularly in his studies of the English language. In 1952, he was selected by his class to address a message to then[dubious ] UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld, but it is unknown if the message was ever sent. Dag Hammarskjold did not become Secretary-General until 1953. In 1962, Ban won an essay contest sponsored by the Red Crossand earned a trip to the United States where he lived in San Francisco with a host family for several months.[7] As part of the trip, Ban met U.S. President John F. Kennedy.[1] When a journalist at the meeting asked Ban what he wanted to be when he grew up, he said, “I want to become a diplomat.”[6]
He received a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Seoul National University in 1970, and earned a Master of Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1985.[6] At Harvard, he studied under Joseph Nye who remarked that Ban had “a rare combination of analytic clarity, humility and perseverance.”[7] Ban was awarded the degree of Doctor of Laws (Honoris Causa) by theUniversity of Malta on 22 April 2009.[8] He further received an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of Washington in October 2009.[9]
In addition to his native Korean, Ban speaks English and French. There have been questions, however, regarding the extent of his knowledge of French, one of the two working languages of the United Nations Secretariat.[10]

Personal life

Family

Ban Ki-moon met Yoo Soon-taek in 1962 when they were both high school students. Ban was 18 years old, and Yoo Soon-taek was his secondary school’s student council president. Ban Ki-moon married Yoo Soon-taek in 1971. They have three adult children: two daughters and a son. His elder daughter, Seon-yong, was born in 1972 and now works for the Korea Foundation in Seoul. She is married to an Indian.[74][75] His son, Woo-hyun was born in 1974 in India.[74] He received an MBA from Anderson School of Management at University of California, Los Angeles, and works for an investment firm in New York.[76] His younger daughter, Hyun-hee (born 1976), is a field officer for UNICEF in Nairobi.[1] After his election as Secretary-General, Ban became an icon in his hometown, where his extended family still resides. Over 50,000 gathered in a soccer stadium in Chungju for celebration of the result. In the months following his election, thousands of practitioners of geomancy went to his village to determine how it produced such an important person.[5] Ban himself is not a member of any church or religious group[77] and has declined to expound his beliefs: “Now, as Secretary-General, it will not be appropriate at this time to talk about my own belief in any particular religion or god. So maybe we will have some other time to talk about personal matters.”[78] His mother is a Buddhist.[5]

Personality

During his tenure at the South Korean Foreign Ministry, Ban’s nickname was jusa, meaning “the Bureaucrat” or “the administrative clerk”. The name was used as both positive and negative: complimenting Ban’s attention to detail and administrative skill while deriding what was seen as a lack of charisma and subservience to his superiors.[28] The South Korean press corps calls him “the slippery eel”, for his ability to dodge questions.[6] His peers praise his understated “Confucian approach.”[14] and he is regarded by many as a “stand-up guy”[7] and is known for his “easy smile”.[1]

Honors and awards

This article incorporates information from the German Wikipedia.
This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the Italian Wikipedia.
This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the Russian Wikipedia.

Honorary degrees

Controversy

According to The Washington Post, “some U.N. employees and delegates” expressed resentment at Ban’s perceived favoritism in the appointment of South Korean nationals in key posts. Previous U.N. chiefs such as Kurt Waldheim (Austria), Javier Pérez de Cuéllar (Peru) and Boutros Boutros-Ghali (Egypt) brought small teams of trusted aides or clerical workers from their country’s Foreign Ministry. But according to “some officials” in the Post story, Ban has gone further, boosting South Korea’s presence in U.N. ranks by more than 20 percent during his first year in office. In response, Ban and his aides have claimed that allegations of favoritism are wrong, and that some of the harshest criticisms against him have undercurrents of racism.[84] He said that the South Korean nationals he had appointed — including Choi Young-jin, who has served as a high-ranking official in the United Nations’ peacekeeping department — are highly qualified for their positions. Others such as Donald P. Gregg, a former U.S. ambassador to South Korea say the complaints are driven by envy, “I think being from South Korea, and people have growing respect for South Korea, that’s a great enhancement for the secretary general. If he brings along talented people who (whom) he knows very well, I think that’s also a plus.” U.N. records show that South Korea, the organization’s eleventh-largest financial contributor, had 54 South Korean nationals assigned to its mission six months before Ban took over the top U.N. post.[84]
Former U.N. Under Secretary General for Oversight Services Inga-Britt Ahlenius denounced Ban Ki-moon after resigning her post in 2010, calling him reprehensible.[85] Ms. Ahlenius’s critique was based on the grounds that the Secretary-General consistently made efforts to undermine the Office of Internal Oversight Services mandate and challenge its operational independence.[86] In particular, the two disputed Ahlenius’s plans to hire a former prosecutor, Robert Appleton, who had carried out aggressive investigations into corruption in U.N. peacekeeping missions from 2006 to 2009.[87] Ban’s staff explained that Appleton’s appointment was rejected because female candidates had not been properly considered, and said that the final selection should have been made by Ban, not Ahlenius.[87] However, Ahlenius countered in her End of Assignment memo that “for the Secretary-General to control appointments in OIOS is an infringement of the operational independence of OIOS,” and further stated, “There is no transparency, there is lack of accountability. Rather than supporting the internal oversight which is the sign of strong leadership and good governance, you have strived to undermine its position and to control it. I do not see any signs of reform in the Organization.”[88]
Former U.N. corruption fighter, James Wasserstrom has also been critical of Ban Ki-moon for attempting to limit the jurisdication of the U.N. dispute tribunal following his dismissal from his post in Kosovo and lengthy appeal.[89] Ban had refused to hand over confidential documents relating to the case to the U.N. personnel tribunal, despite repeated orders by the court to do so. In relation to another case, Ban was admonished by Judge, Michael Adams for “wilful disobedience” for again failing to hand over key documents in an internal promotions dispute.[90]

Question of bias

During the ROKS Cheonan sinking events, he took the step of demanding action against North Korea for the alleged sinking of a vessel from his country. This was reported by U.N. Dispatch as being unusual, because it is rare for any Secretary-General—and particularly Ban Ki-moon—to comment on the Security Council taking action on an issue as his office had tended to be extremely deferential to the Security Council.[91]

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North Korea History and Military Facts

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRKChosŏn’gŭl조선민주주의인민공화국Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk), commonly called North Korea (About this sound listen), is a country in East Asia, in the northern half of the Korean Peninsula. Its capital is Pyongyang, the country’s largest city by both land area and population. The Amnok River and the Tumen River form the international border between North Korea and thePeople’s Republic of China. A small section of the Tumen River also lies along the border between North Korea and the Russian Federation, technically following the river’s thalweg.[7] The Korean Demilitarized Zone formSouth Korea. The legitimacy of this border is not accepted by either side, as both states claim to be the legitimate government of the entire country.

s the boundary between North Korea and

The Korean peninsula was governed by the Korean Empire from the late 19th century to the early 20th century, until it was annexed by the Empire of Japan in 1910. After the surrender of Japan at the end of World War II, Japanese rule ceased. The Korean peninsula was divided into two occupied zones in 1945, with the northern half of the peninsula occupied by the Soviet Union and the southern half by the United States. A United Nations–supervised election held in 1948 led to the creation of separate Korean governments for the two occupation zones: the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in the north, and the Republic of Korea in the south. The conflicting claims of sovereignty led to the Korean War in 1950. An armistice in 1953 committed both to a cease-fire, but the two countries remain officially at war because a formal peace treaty was never signed.[8] Both states were accepted into the United Nations in 1991.[9]
North Korea political parties includes Workers’ Party of KoreaKorean Social Democratic Party and the Chondoist Chongu Party (also there are some independent deputies). The three political parties participate in the Democratic Front for the Reunification of the Fatherland led by the Workers’ Party of Korea.[10] The government follows the Juche ideology of self-reliance, initiated by the country’s first PresidentKim Il-sung. After his death, Kim Il-sung was declared the country’s Eternal PresidentJuche became the official state ideology, replacing Marxism–Leninism, when the country adopted a new constitution in 1972.[11][12] In 2009, references to Communism (Chosŏn’gŭl공산주의) were removed from the country’sconstitution.[13]
Education in North Korea is universal and free of charge (it is one of the most literate countries in the world, with an average literacy rate of 99%).[14] The country has a national medical service and health insurance system which are offered for free.[14] Housing and food rations traditionally have been heavily subsidized.[14] The means of production are owned by the state through state-run enterprises and collectivized farms.[14]
North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il adopted Songun, or “military-first” policy in order to strengthen the country and its government.[15] North Korea is the world’s most militarized country, with a total of 9,495,000 active, reserve, and paramilitary personnel. Its active duty army of 1.21 million is the 4th largest in the world, after China, the U.S., and India.[16] It is a nuclear-weapons state and has an active space program.[17][18][19]
With the dissolution of the Soviet Union in December 1991, North Korea lost a major trading partner and strategic ally. Combined with a series of natural disasters, this led to the North Korean famine, which lasted from 1994 to 1998 and killed an estimated 240,000 to 1,000,000 people.[20][21]As a result of its isolation it is sometimes known as the “Hermit kingdom“,[22] a name once given to its predecessor, the Korean Empire. Although North Korea is officially a socialist republic[23] and elections are held, it has been described by the mass media as a totalitarian and Stalinistdictatorship[32] with an elaborate cult of personality around the Kim family. Also, the Economist Intelligence Unit, a private business based in the United Kingdom, ranked it as the lowest country in the Democracy Index. Finally, Amnesty International[33][34] and Human Rights Watch[35][36]report of severe restrictions on human rights but the government rejects these claims.[37][38][39]

Military

The Ministry of the People’s Armed Forces maintains the Korean People’s Army (KPA), which serves as the military force of the country. The Korean People’s Army (KPA) is the name for the collective armed personnel of the North Korean military. It has five branches: Ground ForceNaval ForceAir ForceSpecial Operations Force, and Rocket Force. According to the U.S. Department of State, North Korea has the fourth-largest army in the world, at an estimated 1.21 million armed personnel, with about 20% of men aged 17–54 in the regular armed forces.[16] North Korea has the highest percentage of military personnel per capita of any nation in the world, with approximately one enlisted soldier for every 25 citizens.[17][164] North Korea also has a Defense Industry that is responsible for engineering military equipment. In 1994, North Korea received 10Golf II Class Submarines from Russia.[165]  
Military strategy is designed for insertion of agents and sabotage behind enemy lines in wartime,[16] with much of the KPA’s forces deployed along the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone. The Korean People’s Army operates a very large amount of equipment, including 4,060 tanks, 2,500APCs, 17,900 artillery pieces, 11,000 air defense guns and some 10,000 MANPADS and anti-tank guided missiles[166] in the Ground force; at least 915 vessels in the Navy and 1,748 aircraft in the Air Force,[167] of which 478 are fighters and 180 are bombers.[168]
North Korea also has the largest special forces in the world, as well as the largest submarine fleet.[169] The equipment is a mixture of World War II vintage vehicles and small arms, widely proliferated Cold War technology, and more modern Soviet or locally produced weapons. In line with itsasymmetric warfare strategy, North Korea employs a wide range of unconventional techniques and equipment, such as GPS jammers,[170] stealthpaint,[171] midget submarines and human torpedoes,[172] a vast array of chemical and biological weapons,[173] and blinding laser weapons.[174]According to official North Korean media, military expenditures for 2010 amount to 15.8% of the state budget.[175]
North Korea has active nuclear and ballistic missile weapons programs and has been subject to United Nations Security Council resolutions 1695of July 2006, 1718 of October 2006, and 1874 of June 2009, for carrying out both missile and nuclear tests. North Korea probably has fissile material for up to nine nuclear weapons,[176] and has the capability to deploy nuclear warheads on intermediate-range ballistic missiles.[177] The launch of a North Korean satellite in December 2012 was seen as a weapons development step by South Korea and its allies[178] and condemned by the UN Security Council.[179]

Weapons Manufacturing

In North Korea, weapons are manufactured in roughly 180 underground defense industry plants in Jagang-do. The plants are responsible for producing; 200,000 Kalashnikov rifles annually, 3,000 heavy guns, 200 battle tanks, 400 armored cars and amphibious crafts in addition to several other weapons.[180]

Nuclear capabilities

In the 1990s, North Korea sold medium-sized nuclear capable missiles to Pakistan in a deal facilitated by China.[181] In 2005, North Korea admitted to having nuclear weapons but vowed to close their nuclear programs.[182][183] The promise of a reduction in nuclear programs has also been reinforced at various Inter-Korean Summit meetings between North and South Korea since the year 2000. However, nuclear plants in North Korea have caused international concern since the 1950s as they are capable of assisting in the development of nuclear arms. International issues involving North Korea’s refusal to discontinue nuclear projects have prevented Russia based Gazprom from developing a $2.5 billion pipeline to South Korea through Pyongyang. The revenue generated from Gazprom is intended to provide North Korea with $100 million per year in transit fees.[184][185]
The Japan Meteorological Agency has been able to use technological advances in seismology to detect various nuclear weapons tests.[186]
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The Korean People’s Army

A North Korean soldier in 2005.
 
The Korean People’s Army (KPA) (Chosŏn’gŭl: 조선인민군; Chosŏn inmin’gun), also known as the People’s Army (Chosŏn’gŭl: 인민군; Inmin Gun), are the military forces of North Korea. Kim Jong-un is the Supreme Commander of the Korean People’s Army and Chairman of the National Defence Commission. The KPA consists of five branches, Ground Force, the Navy, the Air Force, the Strategic Rocket Forces, and the Special Operation Force. Also, the Worker-Peasant Red Guards come under control of the KPA.
 
In 1971, Kim Il-sung directed that “Military Foundation Day” be changed from 8 February to 25 April, the nominal day of establishment of his anti-Japanese guerrilla army in 1932, to recognize the supposedly indigenous Korean origins of the KPA and obscure its Soviet origin.[1] An active arms industry had been developed to produce long-range missiles such as the Nodong-1.[6]
The KPA faces its primary adversaries, the Military of South Korea and United States Forces Korea, across the Korean Demilitarized Zone, as it has since the Armistice Agreement of July 1953. As of 2013, with 9,495,000 active, reserve, and paramilitary personnel, it is the largest military organization on earth.[7]
 
The Korean People’s Army history began with the Korean Volunteer Army (KVA), which was formed in Yenan, China, in 1939. The two individuals responsible for the army were Kim Tu-bong and Mu Chong. At the same time, a school was established near Yenan for training military and political leaders for a future independent Korea. By 1945, the KVA had grown to approximately 1,000 men, mostly Korean deserters from the Imperial Japanese Army. During this period, the KVA fought alongside the Chinese communist forces from which it drew its arms and ammunition. After the defeat of the Japanese, the KVA accompanied the Chinese communist forces into Manchuria, intending to gain recruits from the Korean population of Manchuria and then enter Korea. By September 1945, the KVA had a 2,500 strong force at its disposal.
 
Just after World War II and during the Soviet Union’s occupation of the part of Korea north of the 38th Parallel, the Soviet 25th Army headquarters in Pyongyang issued a statement ordering all armed resistance groups in the northern part of the peninsula to disband on October 12, 1945. Two thousand Koreans with previous experience in the Soviet army were sent to various locations around the country to organize constabulary forces with permission from Soviet military headquarters, and the force was created on October 21, 1945.
 
The headquarters felt a need for a separate unit for security around railways, and the formation of the unit was announced on January 11, 1946. That unit was activated on August 15 of the same year to supervise existing security forces and creation of the national armed forces.
The first political-military school in the DPRK, the Pyongyang Military Academy (became No. 2 KPA Officers School in January 1949), headed by Kim Chaek, an ally of Kim Il-sung, was founded in October 1945 under Soviet guidance to train people’s guards, or public security units. In 1946, graduates of the school entered regular police and public security/constabulary units. These lightly armed security forces included followers of Kim Il-sung and returned veterans from the People’s Republic of China, and the Central Constabulary Academy (which became the KPA Military Academy in December 1948) soon followed for education of political and military officers for the new armed forces.
 
After the military was organized and facilities to educate its new recruits were constructed, the Constabulary Discipline Corps was reorganized into the Korean People’s Army General Headquarters. The previously semi-official units became military regulars with distribution of Soviet uniforms, badges, and weapons that followed the inception of the headquarters.
The State Security Department, a forerunner to the Ministry of People’s Defense, was created as part of the Interim People’s Committee on February 4, 1948. The formal creation of the Korean People’s Army was announced on four days later on February 8, the day after the Fourth Session of the People’s Assembly agreed to separate the roles of the military and those of the police,[8] seven months before the government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was proclaimed on September 9, 1948. In addition, the Ministry of State for the People’s Armed Forces was established, which controlled a central guard battalion, two divisions, and an independent mixed and combined arms brigade
 
The Korean People’s Army Ground Force (KPAGF) is the main branch of the Korean People’s Army responsible for land-based military operations. It is the de facto army of North Korea. The size, organization, disposition, and combat capabilities of the Ground Force give Pyongyang military options both for offensive operations to reunify the peninsula and for credible defensive operations against any perceived threat from South Korea.

  People’s Navy

The North Korean navy is organized into two fleets which are not able to support each other. The East Fleet is headquartered at T’oejo-dong and the West Fleet at Nampho. A number of training, shipbuilding and maintenance units and a naval air wing report directly to Naval Command Headquarters at Pyongyang.[27] The majority of the navy’s ships are assigned to the East Fleet. Due to the short range of most ships, the two fleets are not known to have ever conducted joint operations or shared vessels.[28]

  People’s Air Force and Defence

The KPAF is also responsible for North Korea’s air defence forces through the use of anti-aircraft artillery and surface-to-air (SAM) missiles. While much of the equipment is outdated, the high saturation of multilayered, overlapping, mutually supporting air defence sites provides a formidable challenge to enemy air attacks.[29]

  People’s Strategic Rocket Forces

The Korean People’s Strategic Rocket Forces is a major division of the KPA that controls the DPRK’s nuclear and conventional strategic missiles. It is mainly equipped with surface-to-surface missiles of Soviet and Chinese design, as well as locally developed long-range missiles.

  Worker-Peasant Red Guard Militia

The Red Guards (1997 complement 3.5 million) is the DPRK equivalent of the ROTC/Home Guard/National Guard. It is regarded as a part of the Ministry of National Defence and it’s flag enjoys the same status as that of the other services. With units organized from University level down to the village level, it provides the Korean People’s Armed Forces with a ready-available pool of trained reinforcements.
 
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Korea tension

English: South Korea North Korea DMZ South Kor...
   )
  
With the threats billowing out of North Korean regime, concern is mounting that there could be an all-out war between North Korea one side and South Korea and the US on the other. However, we see the world community and the UN doing nothing to calm down the tension between the two Koreas.
The world community also failed to stop North Korea from launching its controversial missile and nuclear programs. In last few months, North Korea launched several missiles to show its might to the West and especially the US.
Recent joint military exercise between South Korea and the US is main cause of the present tension between the two Koreas. Large-scale military presence of the US had added fuel to the fire. —
 
Khawaja Umer Farooq, Jeddah
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North Korea Threatened to attack US

امریکا پر حملے کیلئے شمالی کوریا کا فوج کو تیار رہنے کا حکم

شمالی کوریا نے امریکا کے تین علاقوں پر میزائل حملے کی دھکمی دیتے ہوئے اپنی فوج کو تیار رہنے کا حکم جاری کردیا ہے۔

فرانسیسی خبر رساں ادارے اے ایف پی کے مطابق شمالی کوریا نے امریکا پر راکٹ حملے کرنے کی کھل کر دھمکی دے دی ہے اور اس بار فوج کو الرٹ رہنے کا حکم بھی دے دیا ہے۔

North Korea Threatened to attack US
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