Turkey’s president : ‘Nazism is alive in the West’

Turkey said it does nott want the Netherlands ambassador to return “for some time” as relations quickly deteriorated between the NATO allies after the Dutch government barred Turkey’s foreign minister from flying to the country. In response to the Netherlands’ withdrawing landing permission, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused the Dutch government of acting like “fascists” and “Nazi remnants”. Turkish authorities blocked the Dutch embassy and consulate as the dispute between the two countries over Turkey’s political campaigning in Europe intensified. Turkey also closed off the residences of the Dutch ambassador, charge d’affaires, and consul general.
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The long road to Raqqa

The Raqqa offensive (codenamed Operation Wrath of Euphrates), is an ongoing military operation launched by the Syrian Democratic Forces against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in the Raqqa Governorate, with the goal of isolating and eventually capturing the Islamic State’s capital city, Raqqa. Another one of the main goals is to capture the Tabqa Dam and the nearby city of Al-Thawrah. The offensive has also been dubbed the Battle to End All Battles in the War on ISIL. The offensive is concurrent with the Turkish anti-ISIL Battle of al-Bab, the Battle of Mosul in Iraq, the Battle of Sirte (2016) in Libya, the Palmyra offensive (December 2016) launched by ISIL, and a reignition of fighting in Deir ez-Zor’s siege.

Islamic State encircled in Syria’s al-Bab

Islamic State militants are now effectively surrounded by Syrian government forces from the south and Turkish-backed rebels from the north, as Damascus and Ankara race to capture the largest Islamic State stronghold in Aleppo province.  

Turkey mourns after Istanbul terror attack

Carnations lie on the ground near the scene of the Dec. 31 shooting attack in Istanbul, as family and friends began attending funerals for its victims. Turkey’s state-run news agency says police have detained eight people in connection with the incident. The gunman, who escaped after carrying out the attack, wasn’t among the eight. The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the violence, which killed 39 people, most of them foreigners.

Russian ambassador shot dead in Turkey

Russia’s ambassador to Turkey was shot dead in front of a crowd at a posh art gallery in the capital Ankara as the angry gunmen screamed “don’t forget Aleppo”. Police later killed the assailant on Monday night, Turkish station NTV reported.
The assailant was a 22-year-old off-duty police officer who worked in Turkey’s capital, said Ankara’s Mayor Melih Gokcek. After the initial shot, the attacker approached Karlov as he lay on the ground and shot him at least one more time at close range, according to an AP photographer at the scene. He also smashed several of the framed photos on exhibition, but later let the stunned guests out of the venue, according to local media. The spectacle of Karlov’s assassination by a member of the Turkish security forces at a photography exhibit meant to highlight Russian culture reinforced the sense of unease over the region’s conflict and complex web of alliances and relationships.
Several media outlets reported a gunfight later ensued after Karlov was shot. Local broadcaster NTV television said at least three people were wounded and were taken to the hospital. Mayor Gokcek told reporters outside the exhibition centre the “heinous” attack was aimed at disrupting newly re-established relations between Turkey and Russia. Presidents Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan spoke by phone about Monday’s attack. “On behalf of my country and my people I once again extend my condolences to Russian President Vladimir Putin and the friendly Russian people,” said Erdogan.
‘Don’t forget Aleppo’
The assailant referenced the situation in Aleppo after he shot the ambassador in the back. “Don’t forget Aleppo, don’t forget Syria,” the attacker said in Turkish after gunning down the ambassador, as seen on a video shared by Turkish media from the scene. “Whoever took part in this cruelty will pay the price, one by one… Only death will take me from here,” the man said while holding a pistol. He then continued in Arabic, saying: “We are the descendants of those who supported the Prophet Muhammad, for jihad.” Diego Cupolo, a photojournalist in Ankara, told Al Jazeera there were about 100 armed soldiers in camouflage and police officers at the scene, along with armoured fighting vehicles.

Evacuation from besieged Aleppo

Ambulances and busses start the evacuation of thousands of civilians and fighters from the last rebel bastion in Aleppo, Syria.

UN report : 90,000 more Iraqis displaced by war since June alone

In a stifling hot office with more flies than oxygen, Rzgar Abed does not hesitate when asked about the biggest challenge in managing the camp for Iraq’s internally displaced people (IDPs). “Space … we’re at 31,000 and that is our capacity. Thirty-one thousand,” said Abed, who works for the Barzani Charity Foundation, whicg oversees a number of camps, populated by Iraqis displaced people fleeing fighters belonging to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) group in the Kurdish region. That number is set to increase rapidly with an additional 1.5 million people expected to flee when the operation to take back Mosul from ISIL starts in mid-October. As it is, conditions in the Dibaga camp are already cramped – each tent can only hold up to six people.
Families fled from their villages under the control of ISIL, also known as ISIS, and have kept on leaving, even though some of those villages have since been recaptured. Most are only within 10km to 50km of their homes. More than half of the camp’s population are children. They flow through the camps, running between tents and climbing anything they can. Intisar Mohamed Suleiman came here from Makuk with her husband and nine children – between one and 12 years in age. In April, Kurdish and Iraqi forces supported by the US took out ISIL targets near her village with air strikes.
“It was very difficult – we walked five hours to get here,” said Suleiman, 34, who has been at Dibaga for six months. She was part of the last wave of people who headed towards Erbil. “We did not think we would stay long when we came here,” she said, still hopeful that a return would be imminent. While she is anxious to go back, like many here she is unsure of what she has to go back to. “Most people have no idea what we are dealing with here,” said Vian Rasheed, who heads the Erbil Refugee Council which reports to the governor’s office. “They have a few thousand refugees show up in Europe and they start to worry. When fighting broke out in Mosul in 2014, we had 100,000 people show up in one night at checkpoints,” said Rasheed.

Syrian civil war: Turkish special forces enter Syria

Turkish army tanks make their way in the Syrian border town of Jarablus as it is pictured from the Turkish town of Karkamis, in the southeastern Gaziantep province, Turkey. Turkish special forces, tanks and jets backed by planes from the U.S.-led coalition launched their first co-ordinated offensive into Syria on Wednesday to try to drive Islamic State from the border and prevent further gains by Kurdish militia fighters.

 

 

 

 

 

Erdogan Supporters Hold Rallies, Calling For Punishment Of Coup Plotters

Istanbul, Turkey : Turkish football supporters take part in a rally against the military coup in Taksim Square

Turkey Coup : Turkish authorities round up plotters

Turkish authorities round up military personnel suspected of being involved in the failed military coup. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has announced that the country will be placed under a “state of emergency” for three months, in response to the failed coup. In a televised address on Wednesday, Erdogan said the decision was made following a meeting with members of the national security council. The state of emergency was needed “in order to remove swiftly all the elements of the terrorist organisation involved in the coup attempt,” he said at the presidential palace in Ankara.