Extraordinary Summit of the OIC in Istanbul

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as term president of the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation called for an extraordinary meeting in Istanbul after U.S President Donald Trump declared Jerusalem capital of Israel.

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Turkey signs deal to buy Russian S-400 missile systems

Turkey has signed a deal with Russia to buy S-400 missile defence systems in its first major weapons purchase from Moscow, Turkish newspapers quoted President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as saying. The accord for the surface-to-air missile defence batteries is Ankara’s most significant pact with a non-Nato supplier. “Signatures have been made for the purchase of S-400s from Russia. A deposit has also been paid as far as I know,” Erdogan said in comments published in the Hurriyet Daily and other newspapers. “(Russian President Vladimir Putin) and myself are determined on this issue,” he told journalists.
The purchase of the missile systems from a non-Nato supplier will raise concerns in the West over their compatibility with the alliance’s equipment. The Pentagon has already sounded alarm, saying bluntly that “generally it’s a good idea” for Nato allies to buy interoperable equipment. Erdogan said Turkey was free to make military acquisitions based on its defence needs. “We make the decisions about our own independence ourselves, we are obliged to take safety and security measures in order to defend our country,” he said. Moscow also confirmed the accord, with Vladimir Kozhin, Putin’s adviser for military and technical cooperation, saying: “The contract has been signed and is being prepared for implementation.”
He said that the S-400 was one of the most complex systems, made up of a whole range of technical materials. “I can only guarantee that all decisions taken on this contract strictly comply with our strategic interests,” he was quoted as saying by Russian state-owned [TASS]2 news agency. “For this reason, we fully understand the reactions of several Western countries which are trying to put pressure on Turkey,” he added. Russia’s relations with Nato have been in crisis over its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine and for backing pro-Moscow separatists in eastern Ukraine. Turkey, a Nato member since 1952, has currently troubled ties with the United States over a number of issues including Washington’s support of the People’s Protection Units (YPG) Syrian Kurd militia which Ankara considers a terror group.

Turkey referendum : President Recep Erdogan celebrates victory

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has welcomed the “Yes” vote in the referendum to amend Turkey’s constitution and grant the country’s presidential office new executive powers. “We have been attacked by other nations of the world. You have seen how the West attacked us,” Erdogan told cheering supporters in Istanbul on Sunday. “We have not been divided … We have already been on our way, now we will gear it up [with the new system],” he said. “We have so much work to do in this country.” The constitutional changes were backed by Erdogan, the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) founded by him, and the leadership of the Nationalist Action Party (MHP), whose parliamentary support was vital to take the amendments to a public vote.

Turkey’s president : ‘Nazism is alive in the West’

Turkey said it does nott want the Netherlands ambassador to return “for some time” as relations quickly deteriorated between the NATO allies after the Dutch government barred Turkey’s foreign minister from flying to the country. In response to the Netherlands’ withdrawing landing permission, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused the Dutch government of acting like “fascists” and “Nazi remnants”. Turkish authorities blocked the Dutch embassy and consulate as the dispute between the two countries over Turkey’s political campaigning in Europe intensified. Turkey also closed off the residences of the Dutch ambassador, charge d’affaires, and consul general.

Turkey mourns after Istanbul terror attack

Carnations lie on the ground near the scene of the Dec. 31 shooting attack in Istanbul, as family and friends began attending funerals for its victims. Turkey’s state-run news agency says police have detained eight people in connection with the incident. The gunman, who escaped after carrying out the attack, wasn’t among the eight. The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the violence, which killed 39 people, most of them foreigners.

Russian ambassador shot dead in Turkey

Russia’s ambassador to Turkey was shot dead in front of a crowd at a posh art gallery in the capital Ankara as the angry gunmen screamed “don’t forget Aleppo”. Police later killed the assailant on Monday night, Turkish station NTV reported.

The assailant was a 22-year-old off-duty police officer who worked in Turkey’s capital, said Ankara’s Mayor Melih Gokcek. After the initial shot, the attacker approached Karlov as he lay on the ground and shot him at least one more time at close range, according to an AP photographer at the scene. He also smashed several of the framed photos on exhibition, but later let the stunned guests out of the venue, according to local media. The spectacle of Karlov’s assassination by a member of the Turkish security forces at a photography exhibit meant to highlight Russian culture reinforced the sense of unease over the region’s conflict and complex web of alliances and relationships.

Several media outlets reported a gunfight later ensued after Karlov was shot. Local broadcaster NTV television said at least three people were wounded and were taken to the hospital. Mayor Gokcek told reporters outside the exhibition centre the “heinous” attack was aimed at disrupting newly re-established relations between Turkey and Russia. Presidents Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan spoke by phone about Monday’s attack. “On behalf of my country and my people I once again extend my condolences to Russian President Vladimir Putin and the friendly Russian people,” said Erdogan.  

‘Don’t forget Aleppo’
The assailant referenced the situation in Aleppo after he shot the ambassador in the back. “Don’t forget Aleppo, don’t forget Syria,” the attacker said in Turkish after gunning down the ambassador, as seen on a video shared by Turkish media from the scene. “Whoever took part in this cruelty will pay the price, one by one… Only death will take me from here,” the man said while holding a pistol. He then continued in Arabic, saying: “We are the descendants of those who supported the Prophet Muhammad, for jihad.” Diego Cupolo, a photojournalist in Ankara, told Al Jazeera there were about 100 armed soldiers in camouflage and police officers at the scene, along with armoured fighting vehicles.

Turkey crisis : Hunting Turkey’s coup participants

Turkish authorities round up military personnel suspected of being involved in the failed military coup. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has announced that the country will be placed under a “state of emergency” for three months, in response to the failed coup. In a televised address on Wednesday, Erdogan said the decision was made following a meeting with members of the national security council. The state of emergency was needed “in order to remove swiftly all the elements of the terrorist organisation involved in the coup attempt,” he said at the presidential palace in Ankara.