South Korean president Park Geun-hye impeached

Ousted South Korean leader Park Geun-hye has now left the presidential palace, two days after judges upheld parliament’s decision to impeach her. Ms Park arrived at her home in southern Seoul amid waving supporters. She has been impeached over her role in a corruption scandal involving close friend, Choi Soon-sil. Ms Park said in a statement: “Although it will take time, I believe the truth will certainly come out.” She also apologised to her supporters for “failing to fulfil my duty as president”. Ms Park has now lost her immunity and could face criminal proceedings over accusations she allowed Ms Choi to extort money from companies in return for political favours.
Park Geun-hye was ferried to her private residence in Seoul in a black limousine, chased by a posse of journalists on motorbikes. When she arrived, she waved to cheering supporters, smiling broadly, and shook hands with political allies. She may yet face prosecution and a trial in an ordinary criminal court. Her demise has split the country, with her increasingly vocal supporters saying she is a victim of a political decision. Her demeanour outside her new residence was upbeat and full of smiles. It was not the demeanour of a disgraced, regretful politician.

 

 

 

 

 

North Korea must review its policies

Despite the tough new UN sanctions, North Korea has been conducting several long- and short-range missile tests. North Korea seems to have antagonised even its close allies like China through its actions. China, it may be noted, has not used its veto power in the UN Security Council to block the new sanctions against Pyongyang. The missile tests are not going to benefit North Korea in any way at all despite its tall claims. They will result only in more sanctions and sterner policy towards it from the international community. Although the global community is tightening sanctions to punish North Korea for its continuing nuclear and missile development, Pyongyang appears to be defiant. The North has ramped up its threats against South Korea and the US and continues to fire more missiles following the UN’s adoption of a fresh resolution expanding sanctions against it.

Last Friday, North Korea issued new threats against South Korea, further escalating tensions between the two sides. North Korea’s state media said Kim Jong-un ordered the country’s military to be on high alert and ready for an attack against South Korean leaders. Due to aggressive polices of the Kim regime, the country remains isolated among the world community and the people of the country are suffering badly. Families in the communist state, according to reports, struggle to secure everyday essentials. Despite the widespread poverty, the country’s military spending is quite high. The powerful military seems to control the country’s entire resources. The freedom of speech is restricted. Full Internet access is not allowed and political activities are very rare. The country is facing tough challenges on economic, political and foreign-policy fronts. It is high time for North Korea to rethink its policies towards the rest of the world and join the international community as a full-fledged and responsible member. Isolation is not the answer to today’s problems.

Khawaja Umer Farooq

North Korea launches long-range rocket

A satellite put into orbit by North Korea does not appear to be transmitting, but the rocket used to get it there delivered twice the payload of a previous launch in 2012.

North And South Korea – The World’s Most Dangerous Border

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) is the buffer zone between North and South Korea, running across the peninsula roughly following the 38th parallel. It was created by agreement between North Korea, China and the United Nations in 1953. The DMZ is 250 kilometres (160 miles) long, and about 4 kilometres (2.5 miles) wide.
Within the DMZ is a meeting-point between the two nations in the small Joint Security Area (JSA) near the western end of the zone, where negotiations take place. There have been various incidents in and around the DMZ, with military and civilian casualties on both sides. Several tunnels are claimed to have been built as an invasion route for the North Koreans.

 Location 

The Korean Demilitarized Zone  is a strip of land running across the Korean Peninsula. It was established at the end of the Korean War to serve as a buffer zone between North and South Korea. The DMZ is a de facto border barrier that divides the Korean Peninsula roughly in half. The DMZ roughly flows the 38th parallel north on an angle, with the west end of the DMZ lying south of the parallel and the east end lying north of it. It was created as part of the Korean Armistice Agreement between North Korea, the People’s Republic of China, and the United Nations Command forces in 1953. The DMZ is 250 kilometres (160 miles) long,  approximately 4 km (2.5 mi) wide and, despite its name, is the most heavily militarized border in the world.   The Northern Limit Line, or NLL, is the disputed maritime demarcation line between North and South Korea in the Yellow Sea, not agreed in the armistice. The coastline and islands on both sides of the NLL are also heavily militarized.

 History 

The 38th parallel north—which divides the Korean Peninsula roughly in half—was the original boundary between the United States and Soviet Union’s brief administration areas of Korea at the end of World War II. Upon the creation of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, informally North Korea) and the Republic of Korea (ROK, informally South Korea) in 1948, it became a de facto international border and one of the most tense fronts in the Cold War.
Both the North and the South remained dependent on their sponsor states from 1948 to the outbreak of the Korean War. That conflict, which claimed over three million lives and divided the Korean Peninsula along ideological lines, commenced on June 25, 1950, with a full-front DPRK invasion across the 38th parallel, and ended in 1953 after international intervention pushed the front of the war back to near the 38th parallel.

 Joint Security Area

Inside the DMZ, near the western coast of the peninsula, Panmunjom is the home of the Joint Security Area (JSA). Originally, it was the only connection between North and South Korea[9] but that changed in 2007 when a Korail train crossed the DMZ to the North on the new Donghae Bukbu Line built on the east coast of Korea.
There are several buildings on both the north and the south side of the Military Demarcation Line (MDL), and there have been some built on top of it. The JSA is the location where all negotiations since 1953 have been held, including statements of Korean solidarity, which have generally amounted to little except a slight decline of tensions. The MDL goes through the conference rooms and down the middle of the conference tables where the North Koreans and the United Nations Command (primarily South Koreans and Americans) meet face to face.

South Korea reported seven new cases of the MERS virus

A South Korean health worker wearing protective gear sprays an antiseptic solution in a classroom at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korea reported seven new cases of the MERS virus in an outbreak that has killed 14 people. One citizen was hospitalized in Slovakia after being suspected of carrying the disease there.

MERS outbreak in South Korea

An outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus has been ongoing in South Korea since May 2015. The virus, which causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), is a newly emerged betacoronavirus that was first identified in a patient fromSaudi Arabia in April 2012.
South Korea reported its first MERS case on 20 May 2015. A 68-year-old man returning from the Middle East was diagnosed with MERS nine days after he initially sought medical help.[4] As of 14 June 2015, there were 145 known cases in/from the country and 14 people have died from this outbreak. 2,208 schools have been temporarily closed, including 20 universities. 3,800 people have been placed in isolation at home or at government designated facilities.

South Korea and the United States conduct an anti-submarine naval drill

Two South Korean warships, the 3,200-ton destroyer Yang Man Chun, left, and the 7,600-ton Aegis destroyer Seoae Ryu Seong-ryong, drop anti-submarine bombs into waters off Jeju, South Korea. South Korea and the United States conduct an anti-submarine naval drill to tackle North Korea’s threats.  

South Korean Army’s combat victory against North Korea during the Korean War

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Soldiers re-enact the South Korean Army’s combat victory against North Korea during the Korean War in the centre of Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, South Korea to celebrate the 64th anniversary of the victory.

64th anniversary of Incheon Landing Operations

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South Korean Marine Corps’ amphibious vehicles take part in a ceremony to mark the 64th anniversary of Incheon Landing Operations conducted by the U.S.-led United Nations troop during the 1950-1953 Korean War, in the sea off IncheonPicture: REUTERS/News1